Free Graze Box Promo Codes

Graze raspberry and coconut muffin snack
Would you like to get a free box of interesting, tasty snacks in your mailbox?

If so, you should try Graze. It's a snack company that will send you a box of four individually and attractively packaged snacks twice a month. I tried Graze after hearing an ad for it on Spotify and using a promo code to get my first box free. At the end of this post, you'll find a promo code so you can try Graze free, too.

I am a frugal person, and assumed that I would cancel after I got my first box for free, but I liked it so much that I've remained a subscriber. Here's what I like about Graze.

For $6.99 either once a week or once every two weeks (delivery is free), you'll get a box of surprise snacks in your mailbox. You don't have to sign for it and, while you don't get to pick your snacks, the surprise is part of the fun.

However, you can tell Graze what not to send you, so if you have an allergy, are on a diet, or just don't like, say, nuts, you can tell Graze that you don't want to get these items in your snack box.

Speaking of diets, if you're thinking that snack foods like dried fruit and nuts are calorically dense and not the type of food you want to eat a lot of, Graze has a solution for that: You can sign up for the calorie-counter box subscription. With the calorie-counter boxes, you won't get any snacks that exceed 150 calories. Plus, since the snacks are individually packaged, they offer a greater level of portion control.

Why do I like Graze so much even though I could seemingly get the same thing for a fraction of the cost by buying a few bags of dried fruit and nuts at the store?

1. The affordable luxury factor. Yes, $6.99 is a lot to pay for about 4 ounces of snacks. But it's a fun surprise in my mailbox every two weeks for a low price.

2. The uniqueness factor. Graze puts together interesting combinations that I wouldn't think of on my own, like the amaretti drops, raspberry-infused cranberries, almond slices and coconut flakes that make up the raspberry and coconut muffin snack. Even if I could think of this combination on my own, I don't know where, or even if, I can buy amaretti drops at the store.

3. The convenience factor. I can grab one of my Graze snacks on my way out the door if it's been one of those days where I've been so busy that I accidentally skipped a meal. They're also great to take hiking and on the airplane.

If you'd like to try Graze, you can get your first and fifth boxes free if you use the coupon code below. I get a free box if three people use my referral code, and then $1 for each referral thereafter.

Graze Coupon Code / Graze Promo Code: AMYF57G5B

How to borrow money to fix up a house

Kevin Quinn's 1866 home, before restoration
Have you ever been watching an episode of House Hunters where a young couple with a modest homebuying budget finds a fixer upper that's under budget and says they can use the savings to repair the house?

I've always wondered where they get that money from, since they probably barely have enough money for a down payment. Where would they find the cash to fix the hideous kitchen and the outdated bathrooms, or to replace the dingy carpet with gorgeous hardwood floors?

While House Hunters doesn't get into the details of homebuyers' finances, there are home loans available that will help you finance a fixer upper, and I've written about two of them for

Kevin Quinn, owner of Bartlett Home Improvement in Memphis, used one of these loans to fix up a house that was in such bad condition that he was repeatedly urged to tear it down and start over.

But he's a big believer in historic preservation, and wanted to restore a crumbling 1866 house.

The before and after photos you see here show what home renovation loans make possible.
Kevin Quinn's 1866 home, after restoration

If you're interested in buying a fixer upper, too, but don't have enough cash to make both a down payment and all the improvements, you can get the details on how these loans work and how Kevin used a renovation mortgage in my article, How to finance a fixer-upper.

Don't get stuck with a tough-to-sell condo

Photo: The Pug Father

Condos are great if you don't want the maintenance hassles of a single family home. They can also be a more affordable option.

But condo life isn't part of most people's long-term home ownership plans. The National Association of Homebuilders says that more than half of condo owners move within six years of purchase.

If you're shopping for a condo, you'd be wise to think about its resale potential before you buy. Do you know which floors, bedroom counts and layouts are the most desirable? Which amenities buyers care about most? Which locations within the condo building your should avoid? My new article, Don't get stuck with a tough-to-sell condo, has answers to these questions and more tips for making the best condo-buying decision.

How to replace your front door

Photo: Ken Doerr

Did you know that replacing your front door is one of the most effective ways to increase your home's value? Your front door is part of your home's curb appeal, and it will influence what people expect to see when they enter your house. In other words, making a good first impression is valuable.

Front doors come in three materials: fiberglass, wood, and metal. You'll also need to decide what color to paint it, whether to add a storm door or a metal security door, and whether to repair or replace your front door yourself or hire a pro.

For help making these decisions and more, see what the real estate and home improvement experts I interviewed have to say about making smart choices for your front door in my article, How to replace your front door.

How to buy a condo with confidence

Photo: Mesa Royale

Buying a condo is trickier than buying a house, because you’ll be sharing living space and financial responsibilities with other condo owners.

Buyers should look at a condo purchase as an investment in not just a property, but also a business: the homeowners association, says Gail Pizetoski, who owns Condo & HOA Smart, which provides due-diligence reports on homeowners associations for prospective buyers.

Make sure the association is not just financially sound, but also structurally sound, by reviewing HOA meeting minutes and talking to building residents, she says.

“Many owners aren’t aware of the full range of their responsibilities before they buy their condo,” Pizetoski says.

After all, the HOA manages the structure, community maintenance and landscaping.
Buyers should ask for the association’s audited financial statements, current statements and budgets to see if there is enough money to fund the operating budget and if enough is being put aside for repairs and long-term improvements, says Katie Wethman, a Realtor with Keller Williams in Washington, D.C.
Learn more in my article that covers 5 smart moves to help you choose the right condo.


A Free Tool for Deciphering Your Investments' Asset Allocation

Photo: Doc Trader

Suppose you and your spouse each have a retirement account, but yours is at Fidelity and your spouse’s is at Vanguard. How do you know if your combined portfolios are invested properly to meet your goals?

A free online service called LikeAssets makes it easy to see your combined investments and asset allocation. It can also show you the combined asset allocation of multiple college savings accounts and other investment accounts so you can make sure you've chosen the correct investments for goals with different time horizons.

I’ve written before that most people don’t earn very good investment returns because of fear and risk aversion. Research shows that we underperform the market over the long run, and that we manage to lose money even when the stock market shows gains.

If you’re like most people, you’re one of these underperforming investors. LikeAssets provides a bit of insight that might help you improve. Read my complete review in my article, Service keeps tabs on your many investment accounts.